Beats Antique / Moon Hooch / Pinky d'Ambrosia

  • Fête Music Hall 103 Dike St Providence, RI, 02909 United States

Beats Antique

with Moon Hooch & Pinky d'Ambrosia

Friday October 2nd

Fête Ballroom
Doors: 7pm
Tickets: $25 GA • $50 Reserved Seating
All Ages



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Beats Antique Creature Carnival

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World-renowned dancetronica trio Beats Antique are bringing back the wild and crazy Creature Carnival. This tour will be a spectacle for the ages. The Creature Carnival promises to bring breathtaking performances, improvisational serendipity, audience participation, and tons more surprises to come. The tour embarks this Fall 2015 in select North American cities.

The Creature Carnival is a collaborative event with spectators and performers alike. “We want to take our fans on a journey,” notes David Satori of Beats Antique. “Now with the Creature Carnival, we plan to get the audience in a more dynamic, psychedelic, and participatory role than ever before. Come along for the ride!"

Beats Antique plans to make every evening a series of musical departures and split second surprises with each night containing its own twists and turns. “I'm looking forward to connecting to our fans in every city on and off the stage!” says Zoe Jakes, “The Creature Carnival will be a collective performance, a gathering of like-minded people and a true spectacle for the senses.”

An Intro to Beats Antique

Growing like wildfire under the canopy of live electronica and experimental world fusion music, the acclaimed musical trio Beats Antique consists of David Satori - production, live instrumentation, Tommy Cappel - production, percussion, and Zoe Jakes - dance, choreography. Forming in 2006, the group now headlines various music festivals across the country including Coachella, Lollapalooza, and Electric Forest. With a stage performance containing more sensory indulgences than the most lavish genie’s lair, Beats Antique will indulge their fans to a raw, animalistic musical event that blurs the lines between the provocative, the spiritual, and the artistic while still maintaining allegiance to the muses of class and beauty. Their ability to blur the line between artist and audience even before the curtain rises creates a total escape both through live performance and the album experience that leaves critics and fans reeling alike.



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Moon Hooch

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two sax players and a drummer whipping up furious, impromptu raves. This happened with such regularity at the Bedford Ave station in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, that the band was banned from playing there by the NYPD. The trio’s subsequent tours with They Might Be Giants, Lotus, and Galactic as well as on their own have only broadened the band’s appeal. Wherever Moon Hooch plays, a dance party soon follows.

Hornblow Recordings and Palmetto Records are now proud to release Moon Hooch’s second album, This Is Cave Music, on Sept 16, 2014. The title refers to the term Moon Hooch coined to describe their unique sound: like house music, but more primitive and jagged and raw. Horn players Mike Wilbur and Wenzl McGowen do this by utilizing unique tonguing methods, or adding objects — cardboard or PVC tubes, traffic cones, whatever’s handy — to the bells of their horns to alter their sound. Not to be outdone, drummer James Muschler gets swelling, shimmering sounds from his cymbals, and covers the head of his snare with a stack of splash cymbals to emulate the sound of a Roland TR-808 drum machine’s clap.

Wilbur was raised in Massachusetts, and Muschler in Ohio; McGowen grew up in several different European countries. The three met while students at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York City, and they found in each other a common work ethic and holistic philosophy. Moon Hooch are committed to environmental and agricultural sustainability, and they’re such fans of Michael Pollan’s groundbreaking The Omnivore’s Dilemma that they visited the farm that Pollan profiled in the book, Polyface Farms, in rural Virginia while on tour in 2013. Moon Hooch literally caused a stampede when they set up and played their song “Tubes” in the pasture as cattle swirled in the background. (The trio lived to tell the tale, and the “Cattle Dance Party” video has been viewed nearly 200,000 times and counting on YouTube.) Muschler also maintains a blog called Cooking in the Cave (cookinginthecave.net) where he chronicles the band’s vegan tour-van culinary endeavors — it’s amazing what these guys can do with a hot plate.

While their self-titled first album, which cracked the top 10 of Billboard’s Jazz Albums chart, approximated the band’s acoustic approach to dance music, This Is Cave Music takes their cave music hybrid further into electronic and pop music realms with synthesizers, post-production work, and even singing added to the mix. “We aren’t trying to do it for the sake of reaching a wider audience,” McGowen points out. “We are doing it because it’s where our passion has evolved to. This album is a culmination of that.”